Because I’m Woefully Indecisive At Some Things…

…I think the hardest part of making a video isn’t editing it, putting it together, or even grading the footage (although admittedly, I’m still figuring out that last bit).

It’s picking the damn music.

As most people who use the platform know, YouTube runs a tight Content ID system that flags your videos if you use any kind of media that doesn’t allow reuse or modification. You can still post videos that feature, say, carefully edited footage of your six year old trying to ride a bike set to the entirety of Psychosocial by Slipknot, but you run the risk of YouTube flagging your video for copyrighted content, and rendering it impossible for your video to be played in certain parts of the world, or even for you to gain any kind of revenue if you’ve enabled ad monetization on your admittedly weird little video.

Now, with less than 20 subscribers to my name, this really shouldn’t be an issue. Realistically, I might as well just play the numbers, use copyrighted music, and take the hits because 1) I’m not pulling enough weight to make any substantial money off ad monetization anyway and 2) For the most part, companies won’t wholesale BLOCK your video, and instead opt to place ads before it that they can monetize from.

But clearly I’m a sadist and like making things so much more difficult for myself, so I search for Creative Commons licensed music to use more often than not, immediately shrinking the radius of the space I can search for music that I think definitely fits with the vibe I’ve got in mind for a video. I’ve had whole projects go on stall because I can’t decide on music that’ll work well enough with the clips and edits and the vision of how I want this video to go in my head.

Using the SoundCloud filter on the Creative Commons Search site works well enough, but I’m really not into heavy electronica or any kind of EDM really, and while I like chillhop and lo-fi tracks, I can’t make every video with a mellow radio filter beat thumping in the backdrop. Sometimes, I just feel Bon Iver coming out through the cuts between clips, and I have to end up settling for a remix of one of his songs instead.

Granted, there are some good ones out there, but still.

Anyone else really nitpicky about this end of making content, or is it just me?

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Because I’m Woefully Indecisive At Some Things…

Those Who Eventually Find The Magic

 

DSLRguide has been one of my favorite channels since I started messing around in YouTube. Back to front, you can really see the progression of his work as he’s continued to put content out there. He shoots a lot of his material with an entry level Canon T3i, and still comes away with some beautifully constructed and graded videos.

It’s not just the visual element I’m into, though. Most of his videos take an almost blog-like format, not a vlog as people know vlogs to be today, but more of an essay-like style, where he starts with an idea and tailors the entire video to explain it. The material ranges anywhere from How To Edit Videos (for Beginners) to not as simple as ‘follow your dreams’, and the variance is great – it means that I can keep coming back to this channel whether I want to pick up some new tricks or not. But he posted a great video recently on the struggle of inspiration and how artists constructively use discontentment to reach the gem in the rough. I’ve gone ahead and shared it above so you guys can give it a watch yourself if you like.

I feel as though artists and people living and working in creative circles definitely do have this funny relationship with discontentment. I think it’s important to step back from your work once in a while, take a look at what you’ve finished, and be happy with what you created. This end product – this poem, this video, this picture, this story – that’s you, condensed into a form outside yourself, rife with the emotion you carried through the process of creating, and here for posterity now. You made this. Be proud. But at the same time, that voice inside that demands that we express ourselves somehow almost necessitates that we not stay too long in that state of contentment – that we need to get out there and start making our next big thing. That we tear down our monuments and build something finer. That we shred stories because we can do it better this time.

It’s this beautiful vicious circle that leads you to better things if you choose to ride those waves instead of getting washed along with the tide.

So yeah. Do it.

Those Who Eventually Find The Magic

FOMO

 

New upload’s up and out in the ether. This one’s a bit different though – I’m currently doing a minor in Digital Communication and Information at my college, and this is my final project. Along with a write-up and a presentation, I basically had to produce some content that links to some of the concepts we’ve explored as part of the program, so I decided to put my English major chops to work and write a small monologue about a bit more of a reflective, subdued view I’ve got on social media as a whole.

A concept that I picked up was this whole idea of FOMO and FOBM – the “Fear of Missing Out” and “Fear of Being Missed” that’s pretty much inherent when we’re working with a culture so driven by what we share, and what we consume online. I think that social media is an absolute benefit to modern culture, but it’s got it’s pitfalls, some that we’re well aware of, and some that are quieter. FOMO and FOBM speak to a bit of a twofold effect where on one hand, we’re constantly worrying about the disconnect that not being connected to digital media brings, and on the other, we’re connected to a culture where we produce as much as we consume digitally, and as individual voices, its tough for our contributions not to get lost in the flow.

Anyways, that’s the rough writeup of it all. I should stop before I end up writing an actual essay. Give the video a look – share and subscribe if you dig it. :3

FOMO

Back From A Long Holiday

Who would have thought I’d end up being on here less once the semester started? 🙂

Hope you’re all not terribly mad at me. I’m settled back into the swing of things after getting a new camera, heading off to Key West for the holiday with my family, and enjoying  the sheer amount of free time that gets dumped on you once college lets out for a month. Expect more photos, more blogs, and more video in the weeks to come!

For now, let me just put this right here…

 

Back From A Long Holiday

Why I Really Won’t VLOG Per Se…

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A nice little one I never posted from the recent warehouse set. I think my girlfriend may be talking to a plant? I’m not sure.

I’ve been thinking a lot recently about projects for the YouTube channel – different things to keep us moving along while we’re working on the more ambitious videos we’ve been bouncing around concepts for. We’ve got what we’re tentatively calling “trip” or “day” videos – like Night Ride and The Downtown Lap which are essentially music videos with a bit of a loose narrative that follow us as a group while we’re out and about on our little escapades – which are great, but I definitely don’t want them to be the brunt of what we do.

Then there’s the Tips Appreciated micro-series we’re working on, where every video shoots for somewhere under a minute. But even those are a little tricky to pump out because of the effort that goes into trying to center in on something snappy, quick, and catchy to shoot, cut down, edit, and post on a semi-frequent basis. Not to mention props – you’ll see what I’m talking about once we actually manage to get another one posted.

Vlogs are huge on YouTube right now. I was a big fan of Casey Neistat’s series while it was still on, and there’s no denying that the genre is still carrying a lot of weight on the platform. But while it’s tempting to jump on that wagon, I don’t think the whole deal would really appeal to me. And it’s not the act of putting a life on camera, or having nothing to post that’s really the issue – it’s more that I think that vlogs aren’t really personal enough in some regards.

Course, you also can’t really deny the kind of connection that some of these content creators have with their audiences, but I’ve always sort of felt that you lose…something the moment you step outside of just living your life and turn to the camera to address an unseen audience. There’s something about the physical act of putting what I’m doing on film on halt to talk at a lens that would really take me out of it – cheapen things, almost. It may be an odd opinion to have, but it’s a constant worry I’ve got while I’m working on projects. It’s constantly something I’ll circumvent with voice-overs or superimposed text, just because I don’t really feel as though it resonates with what I do.

But I like the odd sense of voyeur that comes with viewing a vlog – the (hopefully) unfiltered and genuine experience that comes with offering the events of a day up to the world, because you thought it was worth sharing in a certain form. Maybe I’ll find some way to tap into that without the “hosting” aspect of things…only time’ll tell.

…or you’ll come back here in a few months, and I’ll be zipping around Manhattan on an electric skateboard, wearing painted shades and shouting at a DSLR. In which case, feel free to quote this post back to me, yeah?

🙂

 

Why I Really Won’t VLOG Per Se…